Spirituality based on Eastern Practices

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Oneness

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Spirituality based on Eastern Practices
« on: August 30, 2014, 11:34:54 AM »
I have never posted here before, although I occasionally read this board. I never see anyone here who embraces the same spirituality I do. But maybe, others will pop up.

First, to let you know, I was not raised in any religion (my parents came from different ones, and both stopped practicing long before they met each other). As a child, I learned about religion  though my own independent studies. Being an avid historian, I viewed the Bible through that lens. Curiously enough, I do believe in Jesus (but I see him as a man of great spiritual power, a Rabbi whose intent was to reform his people, the Jews, and bring them back to ways of god).

But all my life I was searching for something...and through a close friend I found it. I believe that our souls are eternal. I believe in karma, and in reincarnation. Our souls are reborn into this world to learn and grow. As our souls evolve, we ultimately will no longer need to return and we become one with the divine. Another key to my spirituality is the belief, knowledge and practice of active growth and transformation through energy work. For we are all made of light, and our true destiny is to embrace love and light in our lives. Connect with the wholeness of the Universe, connect with our own power, raise the vibrational level of our planet...only then will we truly be saved.

My spiritual growth has allowed me to not end up in a mental hospital - I believe this. I have strengthened my core through energy work, and this is all that has protected me from the devastation my malignant unNPD mother continues to create.

Anyway, this is my story...my spirituality. Just throwing it out there in case anyone can relate and uses this same spirituality to cope.

Namaste
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gary

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Re: Spirituality based on Eastern Practices
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2014, 06:16:27 PM »
Hi Oneness

  I pretty much follow the same teachings. I guess mine is a mix of Eastern and Native American.

Quote
First, to let you know, I was not raised in any religion (my parents came from different ones, and both stopped practicing long before they met each other). As a child, I learned about religion  though my own independent studies. Being an avid historian, I viewed the Bible through that lens. Curiously enough, I do believe in Jesus (but I see him as a man of great spiritual power, a Rabbi whose intent was to reform his people, the Jews, and bring them back to ways of god).

Same as well.

Quote
My spiritual growth has allowed me to not end up in a mental hospital -


LOL...well mine came because of ending up in one. ;)
" A bird sitting on a tree is never afraid of the branch breaking, because its trust is not on the branch but on its own wings.

Believe in yourself ".


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http://gawalters.com/blog/

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Latchkey

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Re: Spirituality based on Eastern Practices
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2014, 06:25:05 PM »
Hi Oneness,

I don't post much here either. This may be my first post on this board.... yikes just cross posted with Gary.

I come from a mixed religious background of both Jewish and Christian and have ended up with children that are baptised Catholic but the only Sunday school they've been to is Unitarian and identify themselves as "Cashews"  _Catholic Jews.  :doh:  So, if anything, my approach is eclectic to understanding my spirituality and trying to pass this on to my children.

I found the book Seat of the Soul by Gary Zukav to be pretty interesting 13 years ago - and also a kind of bridge to eastern religions with a bunch of new age stuff thrown in there.

Another book I really liked and read around the same time was Gnostic Gospels that talked about the history of the Gospels and a more Eastern view of Jesus' teachings.

Interestingly I read these books as I was practicing yoga and tai chi and choosing to go NC with my NStepmom and I was simultaneously struggling to understand my relationship with my then BPDH1 who was constantly creating chaos. I did not know what BPD was for a number of years later.... NStepmom used her standing in the church to justify her behaviors and prove that she was righteous. Again, I had no word for her but I knew she was Toxic.

Just wanting to say you are not the only one who is interested in these practices. I have not studied Buddhism or Eastern religions enough to say I am practicing them but the key concepts you mention have become part of my spirituality as well.

Latchkey
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Deb2

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Re: Spirituality based on Eastern Practices
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2014, 10:56:41 PM »
 Can't say my beliefs are of the Eastern persuasion. But my father was Native American and I follow my traditions. I was baptized when I was 9. But my mother left that church and becae a Unitarian. The minister told us to search for the truth, whatever that was to us. That lead me back to my paternal roots. I believe it has helped me with my healing process. I have friends of all religious persuasions, though, and I guess they could say the same thing. ;)

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prairie gal

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Re: Spirituality based on Eastern Practices
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2014, 02:26:24 AM »
Hi, Oneness-

Yes, my spiritual understanding is quite similar.

The parts that I don't have a particular persuasion on, I am perfectly comfortable leaving open to a number of possibilities. To me, the whole thing needs to be big enough to leave some mystery.

I was brought up religiously but through my own studies found spirituality to be a better fit for me. I look at unanswered questions with ease. And through the freedom I grant myself, to understand things of this nature in my own way, I am able to appreciate and accept others interpretation and experiences as something I can learn from too. It feels inclusive from here.

I used to think peace came from having all the right answers religiously.  Peace really came to me through the acceptance that I didn't.   Pg

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micheleswyrick

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Re: Spirituality based on Eastern Practices
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2015, 01:25:39 PM »
I am very close with my spirituality, that is what I believe.

Life is not meant to be endured. Itís meant to be enjoyed. If youíve been living in a chronic state of emotional, mental, and/or physical suffering, then get to know your spirituality

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oceans13

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Re: Spirituality based on Eastern Practices
« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2015, 09:22:10 AM »
I was raised in a strict, religious environment. I attended parochial school, went to mass 6 days out of 7. The parish priests were frequent dinner guests at our house.   At the age of 18, I became engaged to a Methodist.  When I told my priest, the man went over the edge. I had never seen him that angry, screaming and yelling, losing control. He threatened me with excommunication, gave dire predictions about my soul, etc... 
I walked away from organized religion that day. I found my spiritual path and have been walking it ever since. 

My spirituality centers me. It is my source of strength.  It gave me the power and courage I needed to walk away from my NM and NH and stay away, to set boundaries and maintain them, to heal and so much more.

I am very close with my spirituality, that is what I believe.

Life is not meant to be endured. Itís meant to be enjoyed. If youíve been living in a chronic state of emotional, mental, and/or physical suffering, then get to know your spirituality
EXACTLY.
Life is ten percent what happens to you and ninety percent how you respond to it.
Lou Holtz

"Donít let the noise of othersí opinions drown out your own inner voice."
ó Steve Jobs

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Deb2

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Re: Spirituality based on Eastern Practices
« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2015, 03:19:21 PM »
I was raised in a strict, religious environment. I attended parochial school, went to mass 6 days out of 7. The parish priests were frequent dinner guests at our house.   At the age of 18, I became engaged to a Methodist.  When I told my priest, the man went over the edge. I had never seen him that angry, screaming and yelling, losing control. He threatened me with excommunication, gave dire predictions about my soul, etc... 
I walked away from organized religion that day. I found my spiritual path and have been walking it ever since. 

My spirituality centers me. It is my source of strength.  It gave me the power and courage I needed to walk away from my NM and NH and stay away, to set boundaries and maintain them, to heal and so much more.

I am very close with my spirituality, that is what I believe.

Life is not meant to be endured. Itís meant to be enjoyed. If youíve been living in a chronic state of emotional, mental, and/or physical suffering, then get to know your spirituality
EXACTLY.


This is along the lines of what happened to my mother. She was not Catholic, but from a conservative religion none the less. When my father left her for another woman, the church my mom had attended for years began to treat her as if SHE had done something wrong. Like she was a "fallen woman". Supposedly good church men began to hit on her because surely she must miss sex! My mom walked away from that church and attended many others before settling in to pretty much her own way of believing. Once in awhile she would attend a Unitarian church when she felt like she wanted to be part of a service. But that was maybe once a year.

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oceans13

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Re: Spirituality based on Eastern Practices
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2015, 10:33:41 PM »
I was raised in a strict, religious environment. I attended parochial school, went to mass 6 days out of 7. The parish priests were frequent dinner guests at our house.   At the age of 18, I became engaged to a Methodist.  When I told my priest, the man went over the edge. I had never seen him that angry, screaming and yelling, losing control. He threatened me with excommunication, gave dire predictions about my soul, etc... 
I walked away from organized religion that day. I found my spiritual path and have been walking it ever since. 

My spirituality centers me. It is my source of strength.  It gave me the power and courage I needed to walk away from my NM and NH and stay away, to set boundaries and maintain them, to heal and so much more.

I am very close with my spirituality, that is what I believe.

Life is not meant to be endured. Itís meant to be enjoyed. If youíve been living in a chronic state of emotional, mental, and/or physical suffering, then get to know your spirituality
EXACTLY.


This is along the lines of what happened to my mother. She was not Catholic, but from a conservative religion none the less. When my father left her for another woman, the church my mom had attended for years began to treat her as if SHE had done something wrong. Like she was a "fallen woman". Supposedly good church men began to hit on her because surely she must miss sex! My mom walked away from that church and attended many others before settling in to pretty much her own way of believing. Once in awhile she would attend a Unitarian church when she felt like she wanted to be part of a service. But that was maybe once a year.

What happened to your mother is so sad and unfortunately, it's not that uncommon. And those "good" church men who hit on your mother weren't to blame, I'm sure.  The hypocrisy......   Organized religion has such power and to exploit that power to attempt to control  people through guilt and fear is something I've never been able to wrap my head around.  That said, I've seen churches use their collective power to do some really good things as well.
I don't know about your mother, but for me, the effects of what happened were profound, rattling me right down to my soul. Decades later, I still remember how I felt vividly. Some things you never forget. 
Life is ten percent what happens to you and ninety percent how you respond to it.
Lou Holtz

"Donít let the noise of othersí opinions drown out your own inner voice."
ó Steve Jobs

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Just Jay

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Re: Spirituality based on Eastern Practices
« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2015, 11:00:48 PM »
Your journey is so interesting to me, Oneness. I accepted Jesus not too long ago, and I strongly believe that every person must create his or her own spiritual journey. Your relationship with God, or whatever your spiritual power may be, is a very personal, one-on-one relationship, and good for you for being self-examining on that journey.

Before I asked Jesus to come into my life, I also practiced/studied Eastern and Native American spirituality. When I was four, I discovered the Buddhist notion that all objects are sentient. It's hard to describe a connection to ordinary stone, but maybe you understand what I mean. I also tend to feel a need to give up my "high bed" for the floor sometimes, and I feel invigorated after a night on the floor.

Native American tradition is varied, but there are some prayers that have helped me in my life. The NAs I grew up around had very simple prayers, such as "mitakay oasin," (sp?), which is an appeal to everything in the universe. I believe it translates, "All my relatives."

Anyway, I've shied away from any preacher who claims to have absolute truths, and focused on those who admit that we all need to discover our own relationship with God. The pastor I've had for the last four years is extremely conservative (he has a Mennonite background), but he has told me repeatedly to search out God for myself. He has said to me many times to not believe a word from his mouth, but to examine the Bible and whatever else I need to read. And he has given me many books to read! Although I don't agree with everything he believes, I feel enriched by knowing him.
 


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_Redd_

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Re: Spirituality based on Eastern Practices
« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2015, 01:38:23 PM »
Hi Oneness,
I can REALLY relate to your post! Thank you for posting. I believe in God as I understand God. Part of my upbringing involved fearing God and God being on my uN/BPD m's side. If I did something, my mom would confront me and tell me that God told her what I had done. In my young mind that meant not only did my mom hate me, but so did God. So I cannot believe in a punishing or vengeful God because I was raised by one. I believe we have free will because that coincides with unconditional love, the opposite of control and vengeance. I have made mistakes and paid the consequences, not because God punished me, but because that is a natural part of life and making mistakes. I also believe in reincarnation and evolving over lifetimes. I believe we come to earth to grow and learn lessons, and that is our purpose here. And I believe that when we reach the point of learning what we have set out to learn, we don't need to return to earth.

Through this process with my CPTSD, I am learning to pray more, accept people for who they are (not who I think they should be), and let go of any and all unnecessary thoughts and ideas. That is truly a life saver for me. My spirituality is a huge part of my recovery and life process. I am not sure where i would be without it. I am grateful that I have been able to rediscover God and spirituality as an adult, and essentially, start that process over based on my ideas rather than my uN/BPD m's ideas.
Loving someone who doesn't love you is like waiting for a ship at the airport