What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?

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SonofThunder

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Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #20 on: June 05, 2019, 05:40:44 PM »
Parties...

SoT, you nailed it.
I have almost the same experience here. My uB/NPDw(quiet Borderline or vulnerable narc. Not sure) goes all out to make things pretty and elegant(just for show of course), doesn't plan her time well at all, then stresses out just before the event. When she's stressing she starts attacking me as if I caused her stress. Then when I don't react with her I am accused of being unsympathetic, etc. The event starts, she puts on her smile, receives narcissistic supply as admiration for her presentation, expects me to just act like her behavior moments ago didn't hurt me, and on it goes. When the event is over, the mess stays out for a while, she begins to feel shame/guilt that she didn't clean up, she starts thinking she did made a fool of herself at the event, and its all downhill. Once her shame kicks in she starts projecting it onto me, accusing me with scoffing looks of contempt, etc. When I don't ignore her cold behavior and talk to her about her feelings I'm suddenly the tyrant again. What a trip.

Another thing she does before events is rearrange the furniture. In fact, furniture at our house is rearranged definitely every week...

When would attempt to travel together in the beginning it was a miserable affair. I started calling it "travailing" instead of traveling. That was a red flag I didn't pick up on, for sure.

Sorry... went on a tangent from the topic. I guess it could be related. an up mood comes easier, it seems, when there's a source or narcissistic supply. When that's gone, it gets dark.... or the moon.. ;)

Rubix,

You must be a very tired man having to live in a constantly rearranging household.  Sorry you have to deal with that.  Yes i think my uPDw is a blend of cluster b’s (i see NPD specific and BPD specific traits) and they sound very similar from the party scene and blaming side.  If you have not yet, read ‘Stop Caretaking the Borderline and Narcissist’ by Fjelstad.   You will surely see your wife in that book and surely also, see yourself.  All the while, we will keep using the OOTF tools everyday.  Let her go up and down and you just put it on toolbox cruise control right down the center lane.

SoT
Proverbs 17:1
A meal of bread and water in contented peace is better than a banquet spiced with quarrels.

2 Timothy 1:7
For the Spirit God gave us does not make us timid, but gives us power, love and self-discipline.

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rubixcube

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Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #21 on: June 06, 2019, 02:19:04 PM »
Stop Caretaking the Borderline and Narcissist

Fantastic book. It, and all of her work, became an instant resource for me. I definitely saw myself in it, and it was extremely validating to read about the behaviors I experience with my wife.

Here's a question that's related:

Let's say the day before the "up" mood my wife and I had a "talk" and she deflected with blame and self justification every concern I had about her behavior, and in typical un-empathetic fashion disregarded with contempt how her behavior might be affecting me. My needs weren't met, and I can't expect them to be met through discussion. Her anger increases and she expresses that I'm the cause of her anger, etc. Typical crazy-making stuff. I can see right through it now and don't let it provoke an immediate reaction from me.

The next day begins her "up"/hypo-manic mood as if nothing happened the evening before. 
What is a normal response from me?
This question is more to coyote and SoT, but really I'd love to hear everyone's response. I can really relate to you two and often mentally think "what would they do?" in a situation.

My reaction is to feel awkward, a bit confused, and not know how to interact with my wife who just split back up to happy. I get disappointed my needs weren't met and can't help thinking they'll never be met (a definite possibility). I know too that if I don't go "up" with her, then she looks down on me as if there something wrong with me for no reason. My temptation to feel shame and guilt kicks in and I feel the urge to caretake for sure to make everything alright again.  She can't see how her behavior affects me, ultimately.

What do you guys do in those situations?
Are you calm or is it naturally an awkward situation?
Are you not confused and gaslighted by the sudden crazy-making split?
Does it still confuse you but you have tools for managing the confusion and disappointment?
Does it provoke a physiological response no matter what?

What helps in managing your own behavior when your w splits like that and expects you to play along and ignore any wrong was done?


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SonofThunder

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Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #22 on: June 06, 2019, 03:05:36 PM »
Hi Rubix,

You wrote:

 “Let's say the day before the "up" mood my wife and I had a "talk" and she deflected with blame and self justification every concern I had about her behavior, and in typical un-empathetic fashion disregarded with contempt how her behavior might be affecting me. My needs weren't met, and I can't expect them to be met through discussion. Her anger increases and she expresses that I'm the cause of her anger, etc. Typical crazy-making stuff. I can see right through it now and don't let it provoke an immediate reaction from me.” 

I am of the opinion that those type conversations with a PD are not only useless for our own benefit (yes it may help you feel temporarily better but not worth the aftermath), but are also fodder for a PD to use against us, in a variety of ways.  For example, your wife may seem ‘up’ following this type of conversation, as a proactive way for her to passive-aggressively show you that you are wrong about her and your statements and at the same time, turn the table on you, by blame-shifting, when you “...don’t go ‘up’ with her..” the following day.  This in turn causes a circular baiting pattern that helps her stay in full control (where she needs to be as a PD) in order for her to hide behind, and to keep you fully engaged and off balance. 

I want to suggest to you to stop having these type conversations with her, but silently understand she will continue the up and down because of the PD traits/baits.  When you see the down, you use boundaries and the toolbox to stay in the emotional middle.  When she then goes up, do the same thing.  She will realize that you are not in-tow any longer and may amplify the up/down or try some other tactic to bait you into response.  My uPDw thrives on trying to do this, because the control, interaction and attempts to keep me off center is her supply.  After a while, she basically just started ignoring me altogether. 

I also want to caution you that creating these boundaries for yourself (rules of engagement you put on YOU, not her/others) to keep yourself in the center can make your marriage seem very detached and distant, and its just a part of being married to a PD (see 50% rule).   If you have kids, pour your energies into them and in balance, work on your male friendships, if you feel you need someone other than your kids to interact with. 

If you feel your experiences may be similar to mine and others here in these ways, click on our names here on the forum and look at our past posts on a variety of subjects and you may find conversations here that resonate with your experiences, as many of us are on various stages along the same path in marriage to a PD. 

In my opinion, definitely focus on creating boundaries for yourself (proper boundaries as many don't do boundaries correctly, as they try to enforce rules on others).  Also focus on Medium Chill, no J-A-D-E, 50% rule and the 51% rule. 

SoT 
« Last Edit: June 06, 2019, 03:29:28 PM by SonofThunder »
Proverbs 17:1
A meal of bread and water in contented peace is better than a banquet spiced with quarrels.

2 Timothy 1:7
For the Spirit God gave us does not make us timid, but gives us power, love and self-discipline.

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rubixcube

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Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #23 on: June 06, 2019, 04:21:12 PM »

I am of the opinion that those type conversations with a PD are not only useless for our own benefit (yes it may help you feel temporarily better but not worth the aftermath), but are also fodder for a PD to use against us, in a variety of ways.  For example, your wife may seem ‘up’ following this type of conversation, as a proactive way for her to passive-aggressively show you that you are wrong about her and your statements and at the same time, turn the table on you, by blame-shifting, when you “...don’t go ‘up’ with her..” the following day.  This in turn causes a circular baiting pattern that helps her stay in full control (where she needs to be as a PD) in order for her to hide behind, and to keep you fully engaged and off balance. 

I want to suggest to you to stop having these type conversations with her, but silently understand she will continue the up and down because of the PD traits/baits.  When you see the down, you use boundaries and the toolbox to stay in the emotional middle.  When she then goes up, do the same thing.  She will realize that you are not in-tow any longer and may amplify the up/down or try some other tactic to bait you into response.  My uPDw thrives on trying to do this, because the control, interaction and attempts to keep me off center is her supply.  After a while, she basically just started ignoring me altogether. 


I'm very glad I asked. In fact, getting into the "talk" in the first place was me taking the bait. I try to keep things MC and no go into anything deep, then she may ask me a question that I feel requires mentioning a behavior to answer honestly... Bam! It starts. Then I'm on the defense trying not to JADE or get caught up in a circular conversation.

Quote
I also want to caution you that creating these boundaries for yourself (rules of engagement you put on YOU, not her/others) to keep yourself in the center can make your marriage seem very detached and distant, and its just a part of being married to a PD (see 50% rule).

I have experienced this already. In fact thing were going "well" until I picked up on what was happening in our relationship, realized I was caretaking, and decided to stop and get off the dysfunction triangle. Then everything went to hell and I became the tyrant for sticking up for myself.

Now that I've been only cleaning up my own mess, trying not to get sucked into the drama and JADE, am practicing being assertive, etc. our interactions have really just reduced down to a MC relationship (outside the moments where I slip and take the bait). My wife's BPD tendencies revolt at this kind of relationship it seems, hence the baiting.

Thank you for the reply SoT. I deeply appreciate it, and I really appreciate the advice. It's very validating to see you describe experiences I have every day.

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SonofThunder

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Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #24 on: June 06, 2019, 08:31:16 PM »

I am of the opinion that those type conversations with a PD are not only useless for our own benefit (yes it may help you feel temporarily better but not worth the aftermath), but are also fodder for a PD to use against us, in a variety of ways.  For example, your wife may seem ‘up’ following this type of conversation, as a proactive way for her to passive-aggressively show you that you are wrong about her and your statements and at the same time, turn the table on you, by blame-shifting, when you “...don’t go ‘up’ with her..” the following day.  This in turn causes a circular baiting pattern that helps her stay in full control (where she needs to be as a PD) in order for her to hide behind, and to keep you fully engaged and off balance. 

I want to suggest to you to stop having these type conversations with her, but silently understand she will continue the up and down because of the PD traits/baits.  When you see the down, you use boundaries and the toolbox to stay in the emotional middle.  When she then goes up, do the same thing.  She will realize that you are not in-tow any longer and may amplify the up/down or try some other tactic to bait you into response.  My uPDw thrives on trying to do this, because the control, interaction and attempts to keep me off center is her supply.  After a while, she basically just started ignoring me altogether. 


I'm very glad I asked. In fact, getting into the "talk" in the first place was me taking the bait. I try to keep things MC and no go into anything deep, then she may ask me a question that I feel requires mentioning a behavior to answer honestly... Bam! It starts. Then I'm on the defense trying not to JADE or get caught up in a circular conversation.

Quote
I also want to caution you that creating these boundaries for yourself (rules of engagement you put on YOU, not her/others) to keep yourself in the center can make your marriage seem very detached and distant, and its just a part of being married to a PD (see 50% rule).

I have experienced this already. In fact thing were going "well" until I picked up on what was happening in our relationship, realized I was caretaking, and decided to stop and get off the dysfunction triangle. Then everything went to hell and I became the tyrant for sticking up for myself.

Now that I've been only cleaning up my own mess, trying not to get sucked into the drama and JADE, am practicing being assertive, etc. our interactions have really just reduced down to a MC relationship (outside the moments where I slip and take the bait). My wife's BPD tendencies revolt at this kind of relationship it seems, hence the baiting.

Thank you for the reply SoT. I deeply appreciate it, and I really appreciate the advice. It's very validating to see you describe experiences I have every day.

Rubix,

Im sorry that you experience this in the relationship you have with your wife.  I understand as well, the benefit of validation and you are truly welcome, as i received it here also a few years back, seeing myself and my spouse in the relationships of others here at OOTF and on the written page.   

Keep practicing the toolbox brother; use your past experiences with her, that didn’t  end up like you would have hoped for, and replay them in your mind.  Like coaches and teams do in viewing past game footage of themselves and their opponent teams, use the practiced mental scenarios of the past to envision corrections to your toolbox game and think through, knowing your wife, how it could turn out differently next time.  Gymnasts and track and field athletes (high jump/pole vault) also run through their routine in their head, going through proper procedure and form, over and over,  and it is beneficial to them executing it in real time, most every time.  They constantly hone their routine and form and i feel we must as well. 

That mental scenario practice in dealing with my uPDw has really helped me to anticipate, and be sensitive to her PD behaviors that try to engage me and instead of being on ‘defense’, i have anticipated and practiced the toolbox in my mind and i now know how to/not to react.   In most cases now, my implementation takes the wind from the PD sails at the front end, and i am able to continue to move along down the middle lane until the next episode of erratic PD behavior starts to encroach on my lane.  Lather, rinse, repeat....

Sure its not how marriage was intended, but its the marriage i choose to remain in, for a variety of reasons that are my own.   And, i have brothers and sisters here who fully understand.  We are truly not alone in this, and have this in common.  Best to you in your practice!

SoT
« Last Edit: June 06, 2019, 08:36:57 PM by SonofThunder »
Proverbs 17:1
A meal of bread and water in contented peace is better than a banquet spiced with quarrels.

2 Timothy 1:7
For the Spirit God gave us does not make us timid, but gives us power, love and self-discipline.

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rubixcube

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Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #25 on: June 07, 2019, 11:10:46 AM »
Thanks SoT

I was rereading Circular Conversations in the Toolbox. I thought I kind of understood it, but I was way off.  I took the bait last week and got into a CC.

I read about that practice of envisioning an outcome before. I think it was Jack Canfield's Chicken Soup for the Soul. I'll give it a shot.
Maybe I'll try making flashcards of the toolbox tools. Might help to sink it in and define terms.

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SonofThunder

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Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #26 on: June 07, 2019, 06:49:21 PM »
Thanks SoT

I was rereading Circular Conversations in the Toolbox. I thought I kind of understood it, but I was way off.  I took the bait last week and got into a CC.

I read about that practice of envisioning an outcome before. I think it was Jack Canfield's Chicken Soup for the Soul. I'll give it a shot.
Maybe I'll try making flashcards of the toolbox tools. Might help to sink it in and define terms.

Rubix, i will also add that it has always been to my great advantage to keep all things ootf/pd related to myself for my own understanding and planning and also not be fodder for the PD’s in my life to know about, as it will be used to my disadvantage. 

For me, i will not use flash cards because of the potential of them being found and lead to questions.  OOTF/PD terminology can also be looked up on the internet and therefore the source of your info revealed.  For me, OOTF is gold whose knowledge nobody knows except my brothers and sisters here who share this adventure alongside me. 

In addition, my tools and successful implementation skills are my top secret military plans and revealed plans take away my growing advantage and potential longer periods of peace.  Just food for thought about privacy and it’s tremendous advantages to you, your peace and even in love, for your wife....as less drama and anxiety is good for everyone.   ;)

SoT
« Last Edit: June 07, 2019, 06:52:34 PM by SonofThunder »
Proverbs 17:1
A meal of bread and water in contented peace is better than a banquet spiced with quarrels.

2 Timothy 1:7
For the Spirit God gave us does not make us timid, but gives us power, love and self-discipline.

*

rubixcube

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Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #27 on: June 10, 2019, 03:37:58 PM »
Thank you SoT,

Actually, boundaries are something I've been forcing myself to learn/enforce and one of the first things I did was make it clear to my wife that she has no right to my journal. It's in Microsoft OneNote and that particular notebook is locked with a password.  She tried several ways to guilt trip or shame me into sharing its contents with her in the past, but I put my foot down. I was thinking about physical flashcards, yes, and you're right... not a good idea. I can just do it in my locked digital journal!
Think of it as military encrypted communication... ;)

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Mary

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Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #28 on: June 11, 2019, 12:56:51 AM »

Sure its not how marriage was intended, but its the marriage i choose to remain in, for a variety of reasons that are my own.   And, i have brothers and sisters here who fully understand.  We are truly not alone in this, and have this in common. 

I echo this wholeheartedly and draw strength from it. Best wishes rubixcube.
Mary
For thy Maker is thine husband; the LORD of hosts is his name; and thy Redeemer the Holy One of Israel; The God of the whole earth shall he be called. (Isaiah 54:5)

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SonofThunder

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Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #29 on: June 11, 2019, 01:17:19 PM »
Thank you SoT,

Actually, boundaries are something I've been forcing myself to learn/enforce and one of the first things I did was make it clear to my wife that she has no right to my journal. It's in Microsoft OneNote and that particular notebook is locked with a password.  She tried several ways to guilt trip or shame me into sharing its contents with her in the past, but I put my foot down. I was thinking about physical flashcards, yes, and you're right... not a good idea. I can just do it in my locked digital journal!
Think of it as military encrypted communication... ;)

Rubix,

I know i must be coming across as scrutinizing to your replies, but i must point out truth where i see it and please understand my comments are made in a loving mindset  (desiring what is best for another person) to you. 

You wrote “...and one of the first things I did was make it clear to my wife that she has no right to my journal.” That is not a proper boundary, because it attempts to control the actions/reactions of another person, whom none of us have the power to do.  A proper boundary is designed to protect ourselves or another person/animal or thing that we have responsibility to protect, by designing and controlling OUR OWN actions and reactions. 

Your next comment:  “She tried several ways to guilt trip or shame me into sharing its contents with her in the past, but I put my foot down” proves that your improper and revealed ‘boundary’ was immediately challenged and will continue (because your journalling plans were revealed) to be used as fodder for your PD to try and manipulate/shame/guilt you.  She will always be intrigued about that journal and potentially use it as a way to claim she cannot trust you. That revelation puts you at the disadvantage and always in a defensive position as she, in the offensive position, uses her newfound knowledge against you in a variety of ways.   

The proper way to design that boundary would have been this statement, kept private to yourself and 100% followed through:  “I, Rubix, will journal 100% privately in Microsoft OneNote and that particular private notebook will be hidden from view and locked with a password that only i know.  The journal will never be revealed to my PD or anyone and therefore i am assured its privacy and my freedom from any PD behaviors related to it, and may fully enjoy the benefits of journalling”. 

In a caring mindset,

SoT 

« Last Edit: June 11, 2019, 01:26:23 PM by SonofThunder »
Proverbs 17:1
A meal of bread and water in contented peace is better than a banquet spiced with quarrels.

2 Timothy 1:7
For the Spirit God gave us does not make us timid, but gives us power, love and self-discipline.

*

rubixcube

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Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #30 on: June 12, 2019, 05:31:43 PM »
You wrote “...and one of the first things I did was make it clear to my wife that she has no right to my journal.” That is not a proper boundary, because it attempts to control the actions/reactions of another person, whom none of us have the power to do.  A proper boundary is designed to protect ourselves or another person/animal or thing that we have responsibility to protect, by designing and controlling OUR OWN actions and reactions. 

Your next comment:  “She tried several ways to guilt trip or shame me into sharing its contents with her in the past, but I put my foot down” proves that your improper and revealed ‘boundary’ was immediately challenged and will continue (because your journalling plans were revealed) to be used as fodder for your PD to try and manipulate/shame/guilt you.  She will always be intrigued about that journal and potentially use it as a way to claim she cannot trust you. That revelation puts you at the disadvantage and always in a defensive position as she, in the offensive position, uses her newfound knowledge against you in a variety of ways.   

The proper way to design that boundary would have been this statement, kept private to yourself and 100% followed through:  “I, Rubix, will journal 100% privately in Microsoft OneNote and that particular private notebook will be hidden from view and locked with a password that only i know.  The journal will never be revealed to my PD or anyone and therefore i am assured its privacy and my freedom from any PD behaviors related to it, and may fully enjoy the benefits of journalling”. 


You're absolutely right. Thanks! And don't worry, my skin isn't so thin. I appreciate the feedback. That's the whole point of me being here.
Boundaries and setting or even defining what they are is completely new ground for me. To your point, my biggest mistake was revealing it even exists.

Given that blunder, what would be the proper way to set a new boundary and enforce it when she does exactly as you said, uses guilt/shame and knowledge of my journal's existence as a reason why she can't trust me(she has said this almost verbatim), etc.

Putting my foot down, meaning, I refused to let her see it, seemed like my only option here. And it's extremely difficult to do. It certainly made me feel anxious and combative. I'd love another option, because I'm sure it'll come up again... Any suggestions?

I really appreciate the feedback!

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SonofThunder

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Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #31 on: June 12, 2019, 10:36:08 PM »
Hello Rubix,

1. Any new boundary to be made is on yourself, to not reveal anything to your PDw, but rather to keep all things PD related to yourself and to educate yourself and journal in total privacy and in a way that is never to be discovered.

2. In relation to your journal blunder, the battle plans have already been revealed so she will always be aware that you are journaling and will probably  be looking for cracks in your security/privacy of the journal to manipulate you into guilt/shame and keep you worn down by ‘lack of trust’ and lack of ‘oneness’ in marriage by needing to have a private journal (now revealed). 

*In certain circumstances, because of my medium chill (MC) and no-JADE practices when asked baiting questions designed to belittle me into an inferior position, my uPDw has gone as far as accusing me of having an affair, because i am MC’ing her with neutral answers to boundary-protect myself from manipulation by use of the ootf toolbox.  Those accusations are met with more neutral comments, such as “im sorry you feel that way” and they end with me walking away and her giving me the prolonged ST (silent treatment), because of my unwillingness to take the bait. 

So therefore, regarding your revealed journal, in my opinion, you must not bring it up again and when asked/commented about it (over and over) your going to need to have a (privately crafted) MC collection of neutral phrases to say in ways that state “i hear you, i care about you, and im sorry you feel that way”.  The choices and wording of phrases should sound like they would naturally come from Rubix’ mind/mouth, not said in a smart-a$$ manner and fit a style that flows in conversation with MrsRubix.   

I can say “im sorry you feel that way” to MrsSoT, but with MrsRubix, that phrase may have to be worded a different way or MrsRubix is going to say “Rubix, whats wrong with you..??”   Your neutral phrases are not questions as that invites circular conversations, but conversation ending statements.   

—————

MrsRubix: “Rubix, you said last week that i have no access to your private journal...im your wife!..your ‘soul-mate’.  Do you not trust me or do you have something to hide??” 

*if she gives a backhanded comment at you to belittle you, instead of a baiting question (like above), do not respond at all because there was no question and be prepared with “did you ask a question?” when she asks why you didnt respond to her backhanded comment. 

Rubix: “MrsRubix, im sorry that you feel you cant trust me or that i have something to hide (says i hear you) and i surely care deeply about you (says i care)”.  (Dont address the journal question...because thats a j.a.d. E=Explain to the baiting question). 

MrsRubix: “Rubix what about the journal!!” 

Rubix: “i dont care to discuss journaling” (silence and walk away).

Lather-Rinse-Repeat...

SoT
« Last Edit: June 12, 2019, 10:40:17 PM by SonofThunder »
Proverbs 17:1
A meal of bread and water in contented peace is better than a banquet spiced with quarrels.

2 Timothy 1:7
For the Spirit God gave us does not make us timid, but gives us power, love and self-discipline.

*

vonmoot

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Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #32 on: June 14, 2019, 04:34:21 PM »
Quote
I am of the opinion that those type conversations with a PD are not only useless for our own benefit (yes it may help you feel temporarily better but not worth the aftermath), but are also fodder for a PD to use against us, in a variety of ways.  For example, your wife may seem ‘up’ following this type of conversation, as a proactive way for her to passive-aggressively show you that you are wrong about her and your statements and at the same time, turn the table on you, by blame-shifting, when you “...don’t go ‘up’ with her..” the following day.  This in turn causes a circular baiting pattern that helps her stay in full control (where she needs to be as a PD) in order for her to hide behind, and to keep you fully engaged and off balance. 
:yeahthat:

The wonderful thing about banging one's head against a rock is that it feels better when one stops.  Explaining my feelings or how her behavior makes me feel is useless.  In my experience these folks lack any real empathy.  They have it harder than anyone else.  They are not responsible for any of there behaviors.  Others made them angry, sad, etc.

After all of these years (26), I have decided to treat the up times like the down times: Medium Chill and Grey Rock.  It isn't my job to regulate her emotions.  If she cannot grow up and become an adult, that is not my problem.  I buried my true feelings inside a core with a locked door.  I had to.  That was the only way I could protect my psyche.  I started to hate her...just a little bit.  Not too much.  Just enough to maintain my sanity.

I know that every thorn has a rose and silver lining has a cloud.  I focus on my joy.
The demand of the loveless and the self-imprisoned that they should be allowed to blackmail the universe: that till they consent to be happy (on their own terms) no one else shall taste joy: that theirs should be the final power; that Hell should be able to veto Heaven.
The Great Divorce. C.S. Lewis

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rubixcube

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Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #33 on: June 14, 2019, 04:56:04 PM »
Hello Rubix,

1. Any new boundary to be made is on yourself, to not reveal anything to your PDw, but rather to keep all things PD related to yourself and to educate yourself and journal in total privacy and in a way that is never to be discovered.

2. In relation to your journal blunder, the battle plans have already been revealed so she will always be aware that you are journaling and will probably  be looking for cracks in your security/privacy of the journal to manipulate you into guilt/shame and keep you worn down by ‘lack of trust’ and lack of ‘oneness’ in marriage by needing to have a private journal (now revealed). 

*In certain circumstances, because of my medium chill (MC) and no-JADE practices when asked baiting questions designed to belittle me into an inferior position, my uPDw has gone as far as accusing me of having an affair, because i am MC’ing her with neutral answers to boundary-protect myself from manipulation by use of the ootf toolbox.  Those accusations are met with more neutral comments, such as “im sorry you feel that way” and they end with me walking away and her giving me the prolonged ST (silent treatment), because of my unwillingness to take the bait. 

So therefore, regarding your revealed journal, in my opinion, you must not bring it up again and when asked/commented about it (over and over) your going to need to have a (privately crafted) MC collection of neutral phrases to say in ways that state “i hear you, i care about you, and im sorry you feel that way”.  The choices and wording of phrases should sound like they would naturally come from Rubix’ mind/mouth, not said in a smart-a$$ manner and fit a style that flows in conversation with MrsRubix.   

I can say “im sorry you feel that way” to MrsSoT, but with MrsRubix, that phrase may have to be worded a different way or MrsRubix is going to say “Rubix, whats wrong with you..??”   Your neutral phrases are not questions as that invites circular conversations, but conversation ending statements.   

—————

MrsRubix: “Rubix, you said last week that i have no access to your private journal...im your wife!..your ‘soul-mate’.  Do you not trust me or do you have something to hide??” 

*if she gives a backhanded comment at you to belittle you, instead of a baiting question (like above), do not respond at all because there was no question and be prepared with “did you ask a question?” when she asks why you didnt respond to her backhanded comment. 

Rubix: “MrsRubix, im sorry that you feel you cant trust me or that i have something to hide (says i hear you) and i surely care deeply about you (says i care)”.  (Dont address the journal question...because thats a j.a.d. E=Explain to the baiting question). 

MrsRubix: “Rubix what about the journal!!” 

Rubix: “i dont care to discuss journaling” (silence and walk away).

Lather-Rinse-Repeat...

SoT

SoT,
This is pure gold. I'm really grateful that you took the time to spell this out. As you can imagine, just the "how" for how to do some of these things escapes me. I still have 1 foot in the fog so this really helps.

I still struggle with (feel an aversion to) communicating this way a bit.  "i hear you, i care about you, and im sorry you feel that way".
Maybe I'm still too much in the fog/grieving anger phase to want to acknowledge I care about her. Maybe I feel hurt and vulnerable doing that. Of course I do care about her as a person, but I'm questioning how much I care about her as a wife/partner. I think time can heal this part though, and especially helpful would be forcing myself to communicate like that. Thank you.

This contextual explanation of boundary setting has come at the right time. Right now she is away for a 1 week intensive therapy session in Georgia. I spoke with her a couple times and it seems the therapist has completely missed the covert narcissistic side of her issues. I know she'll be coming back with an arsenal of weapon to use against me next time her mood goes south. MC, no JADEing, boundaries, no circular conversation... Bootcamp is almost over...

Thanks again brother


*

SonofThunder

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 634
Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #34 on: June 17, 2019, 09:49:47 AM »
Hello Rubix,

1. Any new boundary to be made is on yourself, to not reveal anything to your PDw, but rather to keep all things PD related to yourself and to educate yourself and journal in total privacy and in a way that is never to be discovered.

2. In relation to your journal blunder, the battle plans have already been revealed so she will always be aware that you are journaling and will probably  be looking for cracks in your security/privacy of the journal to manipulate you into guilt/shame and keep you worn down by ‘lack of trust’ and lack of ‘oneness’ in marriage by needing to have a private journal (now revealed). 

*In certain circumstances, because of my medium chill (MC) and no-JADE practices when asked baiting questions designed to belittle me into an inferior position, my uPDw has gone as far as accusing me of having an affair, because i am MC’ing her with neutral answers to boundary-protect myself from manipulation by use of the ootf toolbox.  Those accusations are met with more neutral comments, such as “im sorry you feel that way” and they end with me walking away and her giving me the prolonged ST (silent treatment), because of my unwillingness to take the bait. 

So therefore, regarding your revealed journal, in my opinion, you must not bring it up again and when asked/commented about it (over and over) your going to need to have a (privately crafted) MC collection of neutral phrases to say in ways that state “i hear you, i care about you, and im sorry you feel that way”.  The choices and wording of phrases should sound like they would naturally come from Rubix’ mind/mouth, not said in a smart-a$$ manner and fit a style that flows in conversation with MrsRubix.   

I can say “im sorry you feel that way” to MrsSoT, but with MrsRubix, that phrase may have to be worded a different way or MrsRubix is going to say “Rubix, whats wrong with you..??”   Your neutral phrases are not questions as that invites circular conversations, but conversation ending statements.   

—————

MrsRubix: “Rubix, you said last week that i have no access to your private journal...im your wife!..your ‘soul-mate’.  Do you not trust me or do you have something to hide??” 

*if she gives a backhanded comment at you to belittle you, instead of a baiting question (like above), do not respond at all because there was no question and be prepared with “did you ask a question?” when she asks why you didnt respond to her backhanded comment. 

Rubix: “MrsRubix, im sorry that you feel you cant trust me or that i have something to hide (says i hear you) and i surely care deeply about you (says i care)”.  (Dont address the journal question...because thats a j.a.d. E=Explain to the baiting question). 

MrsRubix: “Rubix what about the journal!!” 

Rubix: “i dont care to discuss journaling” (silence and walk away).

Lather-Rinse-Repeat...

SoT

SoT,
This is pure gold. I'm really grateful that you took the time to spell this out. As you can imagine, just the "how" for how to do some of these things escapes me. I still have 1 foot in the fog so this really helps.

I still struggle with (feel an aversion to) communicating this way a bit.  "i hear you, i care about you, and im sorry you feel that way".
Maybe I'm still too much in the fog/grieving anger phase to want to acknowledge I care about her. Maybe I feel hurt and vulnerable doing that. Of course I do care about her as a person, but I'm questioning how much I care about her as a wife/partner. I think time can heal this part though, and especially helpful would be forcing myself to communicate like that. Thank you.

This contextual explanation of boundary setting has come at the right time. Right now she is away for a 1 week intensive therapy session in Georgia. I spoke with her a couple times and it seems the therapist has completely missed the covert narcissistic side of her issues. I know she'll be coming back with an arsenal of weapon to use against me next time her mood goes south. MC, no JADEing, boundaries, no circular conversation... Bootcamp is almost over...

Thanks again brother

Rubix,

I fully understand your feelings of caring about her as a person but struggling as a wife/partner.  For me personally, I came Out of the FOG a few years back but have now been married 28 years.  I believe my uPDw is a mix of BPD/NPD traits and reading has told me that PD’s can be a combo of cluster B’s. 

When I came Out of the FOG, I asked myself whether I wanted to stay married to my uPDw, and I knew, with the tools here at OOTF, that I could dramatically improve my life and the life of my adult children (26 and 21), by reducing marital and family drama a great deal.  But, by focusing on the tools, knowing the 51% rule and staying married to her, I would be facing a lifetime with a spouse who would be kept at an emotional distance.  I had really study and redefine what ‘love’ is to me.  For me, love is: wanting and facilitating what is ‘best’ for another person. 

For me personally, ‘best’ is determined by an outside foundational source, not from within myself.  I choose the teachings of the Bible and the example of Christ. I 100% feel that others are free to choose their own foundational source, but I do not believe that we can be our own source.  Christ ‘loves’ a ton of people who don’t love him back and he stays focused on his mission and not only am I grateful that he loves me like that, but I want to learn from his model. 

I decided, in the 51% rule, that I would focus on my mental and physical health, just a little bit more (51/49) than on my loving of those I have committed and promised to love. It keeps me healthy and allows me enough energy to care for others.  I thought about life without my uPDw and I determined I could ‘love’ her and still lead the fulfilling life I wanted for myself and care for the others in my life, but that unlike many, I would carry around and utilize an array of tools to protect myself while doing so.  I have since started expanding my hobbies, working as much as I need to to grow my business (I’m self employed) and take care of myself mentally and physically, all while remaining married to my uPDw.   It’s working out well for me.  I can’t say that it would for everyone, but it does for me.   I believe each of needs to decide for ourselves. 

I am not a proponent of remaining in an abusive (emotionally and/or physically) relationship and 100% support those who must leave those relationships.  For me, my uPDw tries to emotionally abuse me, and in the past I would take its full force and in the fog, be affected in a tremendous way.  But now, when she attempts those manipulative maneuvers, it is quickly dissipated by the toolbox.  After some time of continued ineffective manipulation, she realized I would calmly sidestep and now, for the most part, does not attempt them and just stays ‘distant’.  Her emotional distance is peace for me, and I am enjoying as much peace as I can get.   ;)

I wish you the best as you make decisions for yourself and no matter what, strengthen yourself with the toolbox.  Those tools are perfect for dealing with humanity in general, not only the PD’s in our inner circle.  I feel that %’s of PD’s in the world are much higher than current statistics would state and my experiences confirm this for me as I deal with others. 

Brother, I look forward to reading about your growth and life with/without your PDw, whatever you feel is ‘best’ for you and the others in your life that you are responsible for.  You are not alone!  My wish for you is to strengthen yourself with the tools and embrace life improvement goals for yourself, while guarding yourself with the tools.  You surely have understanding friends here at OOTF.   :thumbup:

SoT.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2019, 09:58:29 AM by SonofThunder »
Proverbs 17:1
A meal of bread and water in contented peace is better than a banquet spiced with quarrels.

2 Timothy 1:7
For the Spirit God gave us does not make us timid, but gives us power, love and self-discipline.

*

GentleSoul

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • 100
Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #35 on: June 18, 2019, 04:58:21 AM »
Many thanks for the very generous sharing and discussion in this thread.

My take away is that I want to be the same calm, level headed woman all the time regardless of where my uPD hubby is in his up/down pattern of behaviours.  I want to be the same. I want to remain as ME.  I want to be stable.

In the past, I definitely shaped myself to fit in with his moods.  It feels very important to me now where I am in my recovery journey for me to remain consistent and true to myself. 

I like peace and quiet, Medium Chill brings me this. 

*

rubixcube

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • 62
Re: What's it like for you when they have an "up" mood?
« Reply #36 on: June 19, 2019, 10:07:19 AM »
Hello Rubix,

1. Any new boundary to be made is on yourself, to not reveal anything to your PDw, but rather to keep all things PD related to yourself and to educate yourself and journal in total privacy and in a way that is never to be discovered.

2. In relation to your journal blunder, the battle plans have already been revealed so she will always be aware that you are journaling and will probably  be looking for cracks in your security/privacy of the journal to manipulate you into guilt/shame and keep you worn down by ‘lack of trust’ and lack of ‘oneness’ in marriage by needing to have a private journal (now revealed). 

*In certain circumstances, because of my medium chill (MC) and no-JADE practices when asked baiting questions designed to belittle me into an inferior position, my uPDw has gone as far as accusing me of having an affair, because i am MC’ing her with neutral answers to boundary-protect myself from manipulation by use of the ootf toolbox.  Those accusations are met with more neutral comments, such as “im sorry you feel that way” and they end with me walking away and her giving me the prolonged ST (silent treatment), because of my unwillingness to take the bait. 

So therefore, regarding your revealed journal, in my opinion, you must not bring it up again and when asked/commented about it (over and over) your going to need to have a (privately crafted) MC collection of neutral phrases to say in ways that state “i hear you, i care about you, and im sorry you feel that way”.  The choices and wording of phrases should sound like they would naturally come from Rubix’ mind/mouth, not said in a smart-a$$ manner and fit a style that flows in conversation with MrsRubix.   

I can say “im sorry you feel that way” to MrsSoT, but with MrsRubix, that phrase may have to be worded a different way or MrsRubix is going to say “Rubix, whats wrong with you..??”   Your neutral phrases are not questions as that invites circular conversations, but conversation ending statements.   

—————

MrsRubix: “Rubix, you said last week that i have no access to your private journal...im your wife!..your ‘soul-mate’.  Do you not trust me or do you have something to hide??” 

*if she gives a backhanded comment at you to belittle you, instead of a baiting question (like above), do not respond at all because there was no question and be prepared with “did you ask a question?” when she asks why you didnt respond to her backhanded comment. 

Rubix: “MrsRubix, im sorry that you feel you cant trust me or that i have something to hide (says i hear you) and i surely care deeply about you (says i care)”.  (Dont address the journal question...because thats a j.a.d. E=Explain to the baiting question). 

MrsRubix: “Rubix what about the journal!!” 

Rubix: “i dont care to discuss journaling” (silence and walk away).

Lather-Rinse-Repeat...

SoT

SoT,
This is pure gold. I'm really grateful that you took the time to spell this out. As you can imagine, just the "how" for how to do some of these things escapes me. I still have 1 foot in the fog so this really helps.

I still struggle with (feel an aversion to) communicating this way a bit.  "i hear you, i care about you, and im sorry you feel that way".
Maybe I'm still too much in the fog/grieving anger phase to want to acknowledge I care about her. Maybe I feel hurt and vulnerable doing that. Of course I do care about her as a person, but I'm questioning how much I care about her as a wife/partner. I think time can heal this part though, and especially helpful would be forcing myself to communicate like that. Thank you.

This contextual explanation of boundary setting has come at the right time. Right now she is away for a 1 week intensive therapy session in Georgia. I spoke with her a couple times and it seems the therapist has completely missed the covert narcissistic side of her issues. I know she'll be coming back with an arsenal of weapon to use against me next time her mood goes south. MC, no JADEing, boundaries, no circular conversation... Bootcamp is almost over...

Thanks again brother

Rubix,

I fully understand your feelings of caring about her as a person but struggling as a wife/partner.  For me personally, I came Out of the FOG a few years back but have now been married 28 years.  I believe my uPDw is a mix of BPD/NPD traits and reading has told me that PD’s can be a combo of cluster B’s. 

When I came Out of the FOG, I asked myself whether I wanted to stay married to my uPDw, and I knew, with the tools here at OOTF, that I could dramatically improve my life and the life of my adult children (26 and 21), by reducing marital and family drama a great deal.  But, by focusing on the tools, knowing the 51% rule and staying married to her, I would be facing a lifetime with a spouse who would be kept at an emotional distance.  I had really study and redefine what ‘love’ is to me.  For me, love is: wanting and facilitating what is ‘best’ for another person. 

For me personally, ‘best’ is determined by an outside foundational source, not from within myself.  I choose the teachings of the Bible and the example of Christ. I 100% feel that others are free to choose their own foundational source, but I do not believe that we can be our own source.  Christ ‘loves’ a ton of people who don’t love him back and he stays focused on his mission and not only am I grateful that he loves me like that, but I want to learn from his model. 

I decided, in the 51% rule, that I would focus on my mental and physical health, just a little bit more (51/49) than on my loving of those I have committed and promised to love. It keeps me healthy and allows me enough energy to care for others.  I thought about life without my uPDw and I determined I could ‘love’ her and still lead the fulfilling life I wanted for myself and care for the others in my life, but that unlike many, I would carry around and utilize an array of tools to protect myself while doing so.  I have since started expanding my hobbies, working as much as I need to to grow my business (I’m self employed) and take care of myself mentally and physically, all while remaining married to my uPDw.   It’s working out well for me.  I can’t say that it would for everyone, but it does for me.   I believe each of needs to decide for ourselves. 

I am not a proponent of remaining in an abusive (emotionally and/or physically) relationship and 100% support those who must leave those relationships.  For me, my uPDw tries to emotionally abuse me, and in the past I would take its full force and in the fog, be affected in a tremendous way.  But now, when she attempts those manipulative maneuvers, it is quickly dissipated by the toolbox.  After some time of continued ineffective manipulation, she realized I would calmly sidestep and now, for the most part, does not attempt them and just stays ‘distant’.  Her emotional distance is peace for me, and I am enjoying as much peace as I can get.   ;)

I wish you the best as you make decisions for yourself and no matter what, strengthen yourself with the toolbox.  Those tools are perfect for dealing with humanity in general, not only the PD’s in our inner circle.  I feel that %’s of PD’s in the world are much higher than current statistics would state and my experiences confirm this for me as I deal with others. 

Brother, I look forward to reading about your growth and life with/without your PDw, whatever you feel is ‘best’ for you and the others in your life that you are responsible for.  You are not alone!  My wish for you is to strengthen yourself with the tools and embrace life improvement goals for yourself, while guarding yourself with the tools.  You surely have understanding friends here at OOTF.   :thumbup:

SoT.

SoT, I couldn't agree with you more, especially where you reference seeing a point of reference for "best" in something outside the self(which is prone to filtering anyway). And for me too, Christ, and might I add the army of saints in the history of the Church, are the models of behavior or state of soul. I have several living examples in my life of model human beings who have mastered to various degrees the passions and are on the path of purification. I consult with them weekly in fact, and it's from these sober minded people, and people like yourself, that I gain direction in how to approach these very confusing things.

I've read somewhere and I agree as well that having an abusive narcissist in your life is a gift. It shows us who we are, what we need to work on, why we attracted them to begin with, and they are the catalysts for our own healing. Without these individuals; given to us, I believe; we may never have healed our own personalities.

Thank you deeply for the encouragement, SoT(and everyone here of course). It's invaluable to me, especially at this point in my life.