Pets defending the npd victims

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Writingthepain

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Pets defending the npd victims
« on: August 31, 2019, 11:55:46 AM »
Does anyone else have a pet whose behaviour is anti the npd abuser?
I have a cat whose devoted to me and whenever my npd mom has a tantrum she will go and urinate on my moms bed or sofa. Never my bed or sofa only moms.
Mom is actually quite jealous that my cat is so devoted and loyal to me. She has her own cat who is nowhere near as friendly or loving to her.
.... last week my cat witnessed mom ranting and promptly emptied her bladder over moms knitting....
I love that cat!

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appaloosa

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Re: Pets defending the npd victims
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2019, 11:26:37 PM »
What a great cat! My neighbor/ex friend, whom I suspect is borderline, verbally assaulted me and my dog stood at my side quietly growling until I closed the door in her face. Animals know when someone is off.

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Moxie890

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Re: Pets defending the npd victims
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2019, 12:19:49 AM »
Haha, that cat is funny!

Our old cat (when I was a teen/young adult, so I still had a room at my parents' house) would pee on my bed when I left for extended periods of time :-\ he did it a bunch of times so my mom had him put down.

Last time my mom was ranting at my house my dog sat on my feet.

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IcanseeClearly

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Re: Pets defending the npd victims
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2019, 09:31:09 AM »
Yes. My sisters cats have peed in my uBPD mother’s shoes twice. And during a holiday visit home, my adult brothers dog (who is normally fine with uBPD mom) demonstrated aggressive behavior towards her with barking/snarling/hackles raised-this was in response to her sneaking into his bedroom in the middle of the night as he slept to “check on him”....something she openly admits to doing to all of us.

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Dinah-sore

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Re: Pets defending the npd victims
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2019, 10:53:59 PM »
Wow. I have no personal stories to share with you, but I just LOVE your cat!!!! I think it deserves a whole can of albacore white tuna!!! <3 <3 <3

I think it is amazing how smart and loyal animals can be. It is like having a guard dog, you have a revenge cat.
"I had to accept the fact that, look, this is who I am. I have to be who I am, and all of us have a right to be who we are. And whenever we submit our will, because our will is a gift, our will is given to us, whenever we submit our will to someone else's opinion a part of us dies." --Lauryn Hill

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TwentyTwenty

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Re: Pets defending the npd victims
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2019, 11:21:11 PM »
If you ever need a cat sitter, let me know LOL :D

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WomanInterrupted

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Re: Pets defending the npd victims
« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2019, 02:56:23 AM »
I LOVE that cat!  :worship:  8-)

UnBPD SFIL hated animals - and we had 10 cats and 2 dogs, at the time.  He and unNPD MIL would visit, and most of the pets would scatter, but for some reason, EmmaCat *loved* to torment SFIL, sit on the back of the sofa and groom his head, which he *hated* - but could do absolutely nothing but tolerate it and force a smile, when I really think he wanted to grab her by the neck and throw her.  :aaauuugh:

He didn't DARE  - and he knew it.  I'm not a violent person, but if he'd touched her, I can't promise I wouldn't have punched him - or worse.  >:(

They'd insist on coming over, so he had to just keep sitting there and taking it, with steam coming out his ears.  ;D

The funny thing is, Emma was normally terrified of anybody other than DH and me - she'd be the one to scatter while the rest of the pets would mill around, but there was something about SFIL that  the other pets understood as, "DANGER!" - but Emma wanted to torment.  :evil2:

Maybe her former owner was somebody like that, and that was her revenge?  :Idunno:

We'll never know - but we always enjoyed how uncomfortable SFIL got, and there wasn't a damned thing he could do about it.  :rofl:

Winter was a Malamute - a rescue, like Emma - and with rescues, there's an even stronger bond that's formed, I think.  They *know* they've got a second chance - and a good thing with a couple of pushovers, who try to understand, anticipate, and *listen* to what we're being told, nonverbally.

Winter always knew when unBPD Didi and unNPD Ray were coming over - it was like he had a sixth sense, but it was probably from the level of cleaning and swearing I'd do, before they even got here.  :roll:

Ray would just park himself in front of the TV, but Didi was a *total* PITA - I'm trying to cook, she's trying to distract me, make things about her, and pretty much try to set me up so I'd ruin dinner by being so engrossed in her never-ending dramas.  After a dinner she'd barely comment on, she'd follow me around the kitchen, ordering me to leave dishes until later so we could "visit" - we had 10 cats, 2 dogs and NO  DISHWASHER.  I was NOT going to let the stuff sit, harden, congeal - and have the pets get sick eating things that should have been washed up immediately!  :P :thumbdown:

She'd also *stay endlessly* - and we had no boundaries.  Even if we had to be up at 6, for work in the morning, if we managed to get them to leave by 1AM, it was a minor miracle.  :stars:

It was about midway through the first meal after we adopted Winter that he plopped his heavy head in Didi's lap and just left it there, staring up at her out of soft brown doggy eyes, and inquisitive, mobile eyebrows that seemed to ask, "Why are you stressing WI?"  ;D

Didi hated dogs - and was *terrified* - but Winter was just standing there, with his head in her lap, doing nothing but looking up at her.  :)

I *thought* I had a pretty good idea of what was going on (Winter was showing dominance behavior), but said, "He recognizes you as the Alpha Female and he's showing respect."   :phoot: :ninja:

THAT made Didi happy, and she went back to her meal - after the meal, when DH and I were going to do dishes, Didi tried to get up to hassle us, but Winter wouldn't let her.  He'd been standing during the meal - now he just sat down on all haunches, with his head in her lap, preventing her from getting up - and wouldn't let her stand up until she yelled to Ray (back in front of the TV, again) that they were leaving - at 9PM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!   :yahoo:

We couldn't believe it!   Did the DOG have more sense than we did!?!?

Apparently so!  :doh:

He did that *every time they came over!*  He'd plop his head in her lap, and pretty much pin her in the chair, allowing DH and I to have mobility and freedom to cook and clean up, while Winter acted as her *babysitter* - until she'd had enough (9PM, maybe 10, at the latest) and they'd leave.  :thumbup:

Since Didi thought she was the Alpha Female and Winter was showing her respect, she never minded it and even came to find it funny that he was so *devoted* to her - I think he was more devoted to us - and keeping Didi out of our hair - especially mine.

He was very ill when we adopted him - severely anemic - but I accidentally discovered he LOVED beets when he wouldn't stop woooing for them, so I gave him my portion - which was the turning point (and opened up new food horizons for Winter, like braised liver) and I always made 3 portions of beets, from that point on.   :cloud9:

Winter was *quite* healthy by the time Didi and Ray came over, for the first time after the adoption (several months later) - and I'm pretty sure he knew how he got that way, and made sure my mental health stayed in check, by keeping Didi stuck in a chair, away from me.   ;D :cool2:

And some people call them "dumb animals" - they're anything but.  :)

 :hug:


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Ariel

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Re: Pets defending the npd victims
« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2019, 01:18:39 AM »
Growing up my dog would protect me from my raging mom. He would come between us,growl ,bark and snap at her. I would always call him to protect me. He was my guardian angel.

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Hazy111

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Re: Pets defending the npd victims
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2019, 11:49:37 AM »
Top cat!

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NotFooled

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Re: Pets defending the npd victims
« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2019, 04:26:11 PM »
I had a dog that would pee on my uBPD ex-friend.  It was a grown dog and I always thought the dog seemed scared when the uBPD would come into our home.  Maybe that should have been a warning sign to me.  :unsure:

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Gaining Clarity

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Re: Pets defending the npd victims
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2019, 09:09:25 PM »
I love this topic, Writingthepain! You've got a smart and loyal kitty!

Bill Murray once said, “I'm suspicious of people who don't like dogs, but I trust a dog when it doesn't like a person.” So true! And applies to cats too.

My rescue dog is extremely smart (almost human like) and has a knack for knowing right away who he's dealing with. I've had a lot of dogs in my life but never one so intelligent and intuitive as well as being such a quick study. He came from a rough background including abuse prior to joining our family. However, since he's been with us, he's turned into a really people dog. Had no use for my Nmom when he met her. No interest in interacting with her.