Executive dysfunction

  • 6 Replies
  • 223 Views
*

11JB68

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • 1435
Executive dysfunction
« on: February 17, 2020, 07:19:50 PM »
Wondering if anyone has info on this or experiences this with your pwpd.
It's not in the traits list, but a Google search brought up what appear to be respectable research sources confirming this is a challenge.
And of course add to this my uocpdh's consistent hypocrisy... He tells everyone how to manage their lives, time, how to get organized etc...yet...
He cannot handle any stress or any type of schedule imposed on him by anyone else. He really does not manage his time. His approach to work is to work all day every day until he basically is exhausted or he's done.
He cannot seem to be able to tell a client how long a project will take. He can't plan to take a day off. He can't juggle more than one thing at a time. For years he's basically had one major client. Decided a while ago that he had to try to diversify but really seems unable to do that, since he can't seem to balance his time across several clients or projects, it's all or nothing.
One of his own side projects is literally organizing and reorganizing his own files so that it will be easier for him to find things. This has taken a lot of his time for several years, and when I used to question him about it he'd get very defensive.

*

NumbLotus

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 588
Re: Executive dysfunction
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2020, 07:36:06 PM »
My H has severe executive dysfunction, but I'm not convinced it's mainly PD-related in his case.

Of course the RESULTS of his executive dysfunction lands us smack in downtown PDville.
Just a castaway, an island lost at sea
Another lonely day, noone here but me
More loneliness than any man could bear

*

GettingOOTF

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • 1349
Re: Executive dysfunction
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2020, 08:19:54 PM »
My ex could not hold down a job. He worked low level admin type jobs when he did work.

He constantly gave me career advice and generally told me and everyone how to live their lives, down to the smallest detail. He couldn’t get to work on time or manage basic work tasks. It was completely mystifying to me.

I think in his case it was laziness on his past  and enabling on mine and friends/family.

*

Poison Ivy

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 818
Re: Executive dysfunction
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2020, 08:23:45 PM »
I think that problems with executive function are common in people with ADD and ADHD.  My ex-husband, who was diagnosed with ADHD about 15 years ago, has challenges with executive function.

*

Jsinjin

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • 263
Re: Executive dysfunction
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2020, 08:52:46 PM »
I think it's an OCPD tendency to only be able to focus on something from a perfectionist perspective which bleeds over into executive dysfunction.   It's a set of beliefs and rigid rules that prevent them from seeing a big picture and letting good enough occasionally replace "perfect"   

I can say that my uOCPDw will not let me even pay a bill or file a single document even though I am the sole breadwinner and she can live with late fees, piles of unsorted paper and doing every task at the very last minute while never allowing any meeting to be unattended.    Which is a set of behaviors that are part of executive dysfunction.
It is unwise to seek prominence in a field whose routine chores you do not enjoy.

-Wolfgang Pauli

*

SparkStillLit

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • 406
Re: Executive dysfunction
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2020, 09:00:22 PM »
Here too. Similar behavior.  I never knew a name for it. Can't let anyone else do anything because they won't do it "right", but cannot manage to get tasks accomplished except in the last hour, and then high stress & drama. Some tasks that don't come with any urgency NEVER get done.
This drives me NUTS.

*

NumbLotus

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 588
Re: Executive dysfunction
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2020, 09:12:25 PM »
Yeah, my H has ADD. Dunno if that might or might not be related to childhood trauma.

Also, his sense of time is completely unmoored from anything I can understand.

He is merely ocd and not ocpd, though, thankfully. So he stays in his own lane. But his issue, such as it is, has become severe. When he thinks about all the ways life has screwed him, the fact that he can't just stay in his room and come out only for food is probably number two (number one is he cannot figure out why he is not a millionaire).
Just a castaway, an island lost at sea
Another lonely day, noone here but me
More loneliness than any man could bear